?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
What's New?
labandbooks
proseandkahn
Just three this week, budget not busted too badly:

unspoken
Unspoken: a story from the Underground Railroad by Henry Cole. unpgd. Scholastic Inc., November 1, 2012. 9780545399975.

Publisher synopsis: A young girl's courage is tested in this haunting, wordless story.

When a farm girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in the barn, she is at once startled and frightened.

But the stranger's fearful eyes weigh upon her conscience,
and she must make a difficult choice.
Will she have the courage to help him?

Unspoken gifts of humanity unite the girl and the runaway as they each face a journey:
one following the North Star,
the other following her heart.

Henry Cole's unusual and original rendering of the Underground Railroad speaks directly to our deepest sense of compassion.

I featured this book in a Waiting on Wednesday post back in June, when I first heard about it. I wanted it badly for both my personal and school library collections. I thought of it earlier this week, as I was putting together a list of wordless books for a talk I'm giving later today at a workshop. I checked online for some publication information and found that, even though the publication date is November 1, BN was shipping! Win!

frank
Frankenstein: a monstrous parody by 

Frankenstein is the scariest of all the monsters in Miss Devel's castle. He can frighten anything—animals, parents, even rocks. Until one night, Miss Devel wakes up and runs downstairs to find that Frankenstein has lost his head!

I can't remember right now how I heard about this one. My boy's loved the Madeline books when they were small so I couldn't resist. I have already read it, but can't review it because I showed it to a fifth grade teacher, who snatched it up for a read aloud... I love my job.

choosing
Choosing to Read: connecting middle schoolers to books by Joan Schroeder Kindig. 138 p. Heinemann, September, 2012. 9780325031446.

Partial Publisher Synopsis: "They aren't going to read A Tale of Two Cities no matter how many times we assign it. Put Dickens away for a bit and try some books that will turn your students into real readers."

-Joan Schroeder Kindig

What do we ultimately want from our students as readers? More than just becoming readers, we want them to want to read.

About the only "adult" reading I do is professional reading. Professor Nana mentioned this one in her blog recently. When Professor Nana speaks, I listen. She's the only reason I'm back on Twitter. 

That's what's new with me this week. What's new with you? Happy Reading!

Tags: